Table manners across the globe

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Did it ever happen to you to think that another person eating in the same place, obviously a foreigner, has bad table manners? Did you ever think that perhaps he or she are only acting according to what it is custom in his or hers home country? Yes, different people have different customs and what may be rule to you is something strange to another person.

For instance, in my country, Romania, it is considered rude to burp during or after the meal, but I know there are places where burping after the meal is mandatory to show that you liked what you ate. See the huge difference? And keep in mind that everyone behaves obeying the rule of the place of origin.

And this is just an example that shows us that, even if we, as humans, are more similar than we might think, in some ways are very different.

Knowing the table customs of the country you are visiting – and using them – is, in my opinion, a sign of respect. True, if there is a special delegation or visit, then the host can also adapt to the visitors. But, when traveling, we should try to respect the common customs from the places we are visiting.

There are many places where you can see how different people behave when it comes to eating. Famous restaurants or fast food chains can provide a good place to observe how people behave: how they eat, depending on where they come from. Some adapt to the local customs, some don’t, even if they spend a longer time in a place.

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You can also see the different table manners used in hotel restaurants – some customs will be OK, some might bother you (loud talk, burping, etc.).

To show you some of the important differences and table manners around the world, I’m inviting you today to see the infographic below, compiled by Wimdu, that has a series of dinner (though I’d say generally) table customs from across the globe.

What would you add to the list?

10 customs - table manners around the world - #infographic

Lori

I’m offering public relations, communications and image counseling in everyday life and I have a PR agency – PRwave INTERNATIONAL. I am passionate about reading, blogging (I also have a blog in Romanian) and traveling. Follow me on Twitter - @violetaloredana (Romanian) and @TravelMoments.

17 thoughts on “Table manners across the globe

  • 2 October, 2015 at 00:32
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    I remember sobremesa from when we were travelling through Spain. I always really enjoyed being able to sit back and relax after a meal (especially the huge lunches), and when we sat outside there was so much people watching to do!

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  • 3 October, 2015 at 08:43
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    How interesting, each country definitely has their own customs. It would be nice to know these when visiting another country.

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  • 3 October, 2015 at 11:55
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    Oooh this is intersting. In India, when eating with hands, you must not use the left one as it is considered dirty. Left hands apparently are only used to dirty…business.

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  • 3 October, 2015 at 14:54
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    Oh wow it’s nice to learn all these things. Thanks for the infographics becasue it’s easier to imagine the rules and know the do’s and dont’s with pictures. I don’t like eating anything with fingers.

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  • 3 October, 2015 at 16:07
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    wow, those western table manners are mostly new to me. as for the Japanese manners of not sticking your chopsticks into your food, it’s the same as us chinese (singaporean). I believe all asians using chopsticks will have the same table manners for that.

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  • 3 October, 2015 at 16:17
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    These are customs that are very important to know. It’s good to be familiar with it. I heard when we were in korea that the oldest person in the group also pours for the youngest… or is it the other way around but yes, these customs are good to take note of.

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  • 4 October, 2015 at 05:41
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    Ohhh, table manners? Well, learning the customs and traditions of each tribe or country is a daunting tasks. I burp when I wanted to…that’s my right. That’s eating in my own abode give me the freedom to do without having offending other people manners. Unluckily, I don’t eat much at the formal gathering because of table etiquettes.

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  • 4 October, 2015 at 07:42
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    Great infographic on table manners in different countries. I’ve never been to any of them personally but this is good to know for when I do get to visit one day. 🙂

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  • 4 October, 2015 at 10:15
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    wow! each country has a unique table manners that travellers should familiarized with. Great information you have shared Sis.

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  • 5 October, 2015 at 00:01
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    Out of all the tradition you’ve shown, Japanese is the only one I know. It really is a must to research about a place you’ll be visiting, that includes table manners, to be aware of what to expect in that place. It has been fun and informative reading your post. 🙂

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  • 5 October, 2015 at 02:17
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    These are very interesting advice for travellers. We do not want to offend our hosts in different countries. Thanks you very much for these. Will be referring back to this list as the need arises.

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  • 5 October, 2015 at 10:00
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    Nice to see all the different etiquette around the world. Some of them has become a world wide / universal thing! Love the images too!

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  • 5 October, 2015 at 11:24
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    Funny how the common etiquette is already uncommon. They should really spread the word on the proper table etiquette.

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  • 5 October, 2015 at 13:00
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    This is very much helpful! Yes, I couldn’t agree even more that know table manners of other countries are important to avoid bad impressions and such. We don’t want to be judgmental anyway. And knowing these things are a sign of respect.

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  • 5 October, 2015 at 17:46
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    That is one of the beauty of travel isn’t it! So much to learn, of another culture, another people. Love the infoGraphic!

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  • 6 October, 2015 at 08:32
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    So many different manners for every country and culture but for me the universal table manner is removing gats/baseball cap when at the table

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  • 6 October, 2015 at 21:12
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    I much prefer the habit of eating asparagus with your fingers instead of utensils! Great list!

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